Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Digital image sensors become the physicians of the future

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 November 2017

It goes without saying that there are not enough doctors in the world to see everyone, every day, for all our health needs. Doctors will only see us if we go to their offices, and will only run complicated tests if they have a reason to do so. The situation is even worse for those living in rural areas and the developing world, as they may not even have a doctor nearby.

We are, and always will be, the first line of defense for our own health. We can figure out when something is wrong, like when a parent checks their child’s temperature using the back of their hand to see if they have a fever.

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People, not technology will make cities smarter

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 3 November 2017

It’s a cold morning in San Francisco and I’m in an Uber wishing I’d had time to rent a bike. We’re meandering slowly through commuter traffic to get to a talk with what now feels like the toughest audience I have ever faced. I’m talking about the 321 five to 11-year old students of North Hillsborough School, a respected primary in the suburbs of this great city. As CEO of a UK clean-tech company, Pavegen, I suddenly feel exposed and nervous. Will the slides work on the school’s set-up? Do I have any jokes for this age group? Will the kids get it?

I needn’t have worried. The children and their teachers were amazing. We’ve had a good deal of experience in schools, but I’m always blown away by the intensity of the reaction that our technology inspires in young people.

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Young designer sees fighter jet technology bring trophy design to life

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 1 November 2017

A young student who designed a trophy that will be presented to some of the world’s leading engineers has been given a behind the scenes tour of BAE Systems’ advanced manufacturing site where the trophy will be made.

Samuel Bentley, 16, of Prestatyn, Wales, visited the New Product and Process Development Centre (NPPDC) at BAE Systems in Samlesbury, Lancashire, where the company is pioneering world-leading technology to revolutionise manufacturing of military aircraft.

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Celebrating the creation of digital imaging sensors

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 1 November 2017

A picture is worth a thousand words. Transcending languages, they cross oceans, reach out from space and show us inside the human body. In December, the winners of the 2017 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering will receive their award at Buckingham Palace. They are to be honoured for creating digital imaging sensors. Together, they have revolutionised the way we see and capture the world around us.

Digital imaging allows people worldwide access to a vast array of pictures and videos.  They have enable high-speed, low-cost colour imaging at a resolution and sensitivity that can exceed that of the human eye.  From snaps of individual cells to stars billions of light years away, image sensors have transformed our lives.

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‘Operation Haptics’: Training Clinicians in Virtual Reality

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 31 October 2017

Now is an incredibly exciting time to capitalize on what has been a hive of behind the scenes activity in haptics.  Haptics is best understood as the feedback generated by a computer as a result of a user’s interaction. Imagine using your fingers to select your favourite piece of music or latest podcast on your smartphone without having to look.   A haptics expert can create touch experiences by applying sensation, force or vibrations to a device, which responds when users physically interact with it. When applied to virtual reality (VR), this ‘human oriented’ engineering gives a much more believable, realistic and immersive experience. This has enormous potential to change the way we work, learn and play.

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The right to breathe clean air: making the invisible visible

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 23 October 2017

Air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) state that in 2012, around 7 million people died because of air pollution exposure. This accounted for one in eight of total global deaths. They estimate polluted air costs the world $3-5 trillion per year and affects 92% of people on the planet. Reducing air pollution could save trillions of dollars and millions of lives. In the UK alone, the economic cost of air pollution is an estimated £54 billion. Every year, over 40,000 deaths can be linked to poor air quality.  This is without including new evidence that links with health issues such as diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.

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GRAID moves closer to the pipeline front line

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 18 October 2017

With a bold new twin-chassis design, our ground-breaking GRAID robot is on track to transform the way National Grid inspects previously unreachable sections of its network. Project Lead David Hardman shares the latest as this innovative pipe dream gets closer to reality.

Human fascination with the power of machines has remained undimmed for decades. So it’s no surprise that our latest robotic innovation – Project GRAID – has been capturing the imagination of everyone from the national press to the gas industry, our customers and stakeholders.

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Cigarette butts pave the way to greener construction

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 16 October 2017

A team of engineers at RMIT University in Melbourne have found a novel use for the trillions of cigarette butts that litter our streets.

By coating discarded butts in paraffin or bitumen, the team can mix them into asphalt concrete, making a new building material. this new asphalt mixture can create cooler, greener pavements in cities and towns. By lowering the asphalt’s density, pavements become more porous, draining surface water away. Another useful property is the asphalt’s lower thermal conductivity. By soaking up less of the sun’s heat, the cool pavements could cut the ‘urban heat island’ effect felt in many cities.

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