Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Creativity

My favourite engineering innovations

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 15 August 2019

People often associate engineering with bridges and buildings, but, in fact, engineering is all around us. From sustainable coffee cups and people-powered pavements to new medical technologies, quantum computers, and the internet of things, there is a huge range of engineering wonders that we encounter in our day-to-day. The sheer variety of these innovations never fails to amaze me, but two of my favourites are an incredible paint called Inesfly, and a videogame called MalariaSpot. Both of these – while entirely unknown to most – save thousands of lives from insect-borne diseases every year.

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nowlight – renewable power; anytime and anywhere

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 11 December 2018

Image of a boy reading using the light of a kerosene lamp.

At times, it may appear to some that innovative technologies and products tend to spring up out of the blue – that John or Jane Doe woke up one morning and engineered a working product by nightfall. In rare cases, this is (more or less) the case. However, more often than not the truth is that the innovative technologies we see in the news were developed rather more meticulously – the result of continuous iterative processes that significantly transform a product from its original concept. ‘nowlight’, a renewable energy solution produced by company Deciwatt, is one such example – generating instant on-demand power independent of the weather.

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Create the Trophy reopens to young designers around the world

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 5 October 2018

Create the Trophy combines creativity with 3D design technology to construct a piece of engineering history.

After Create the Trophy’s first international entrants produced a breadth of innovative designs in 2016, the competition is back again in 2018 alongside the newly improved #QEPrize3D app, available on both iOS and Android. Aspiring designers aged between 14 and 24 from around the world can try their hand at creating a unique and innovative trophy design that captures the essence and wonder of engineering. From rockets and satellites to nanotechnology and quantum computing – engineering is a fundamental element of global society and produces a vast selection of innovations from which users can draw inspiration as they #CreatetheTrophy.

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Kodama: 3D creation made child’s play

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 June 2018

Kodama is a new platform launching today (6th June) on Kickstarter that allows people to intuitively express their imagination in 3D environments. The first commercial use of the technology, Kodama3DGo, will allow kids – or adults with a taste for imagination – to create in three dimensions by moving the 3DGo controller with their hands.

We sat down with Charles Leclercq, Founder and Director at Kodama, to learn more about where the technology started.

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Arcadia’s fire-breathing spider inspires young engineers

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 11 May 2018

Imagine that you’re in the middle of a festival crowd, dancing away to the most dynamic names in music. 50-foot fireballs are exploding into the air, audience members are being abducted by acrobatic performers and luminescent creatures are swooping from the sky. Oh, and imagine that you’re looking up at a 50-tonne mechanical spider.

Arcadia is a performance art collective renowned for engineering mechanical monsters that they use as large-scale performance spaces. Perhaps the most recognisable of these is The Spider, a 360-degree structure built from recycled materials. Created by sculptors, engineers, painters and pyrotechnicians, the arachnid is an experiential dance stage for festival attendees.

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When buildings breathe: Nature meets architecture

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 3 May 2018

Architecture has been borrowing from Mother Nature for millennia. The first structures were made from natural materials; wood, straw, stone and soils. Many common objects that we use today are inspired by plant life too – burdock burs inspired George de Mestral to invent Velcro in 1955, and wind turbines are inspired by the fins of humpback whales!

Today, as engineers face the issues caused by climate change and high energy consumption, they are drawing on nature again to change the way we build our homes and offices.

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AI: The future of music creation?

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 29 March 2018

The evolution of music creation has always been rife with controversy and resistance. Take the words of early 20th century classical guitar virtuoso Andres Segovia.

“Electric guitars are an abomination, whoever heard of an electric violin? An electric cello? Or for that matter an electric singer?”

But as Segovia probably knew; breaking barriers and ruffling feathers is the backbone of art and music. As with evolution of technology in any industry, the sea of change pays no respect to protests from the old guard. These days, electric violins, cellos and even singers are commonplace. As for electric guitars? Last year over one million electric guitars were sold in the US.

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Reflecting on displays

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 20 February 2018

Electronically displayed information is everywhere; smartphones, laptops, TV, advertising billboards, wearables… the list of devices we use goes on and on. These displays are mostly based on either liquid crystal (LCD) or organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. These are great technologies, but they are not without limitations. We have all experienced the poor readability of a phone screen in sunlight and short battery life, largely due to the high power consumption of the display. Recent research has also shown that evening use of these light-emitting devices can negatively affect sleep and next-morning alertness.

So how can we design the next generation of displays to address these issues? A promising approach is to develop displays which can reflect natural ambient light or room lights to illuminate the screen, rather than using the powerful backlighting used in LCDs. Deployed in eReader devices, reflective displays provide vastly improved power consumption and outdoor readability. But this current form of reflective display technology cannot render good colour, nor deliver video rate refresh rates – a major limiting factor to wider application.

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