Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Software and the Internet

From photo to finished model: the software making 3D mapping a snap

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 17 November 2017

Trik software displayed on tablet

Over the years, drones have gained popularity in the engineering and construction industry. Small and simple to fly, drones can quickly snap photos from every angle, giving a bird’s eye view of inaccessible areas. But thousands of photos are meaningless without the right tools to manage them. Drone mapping technology, or ‘photogrammetry’, helps make this task easier by converting drone photos into a 3D model. However, having only the 3D model is still not practical in most engineering work, especially in infrastructure inspection and maintenance. Trik is a specialised system, creating a 3D database. This allows engineering companies to make the most of their drone data.

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Digital image sensors become the physicians of the future

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 November 2017

It goes without saying that there are not enough doctors in the world to see everyone, every day, for all our health needs. Doctors will only see us if we go to their offices, and will only run complicated tests if they have a reason to do so. The situation is even worse for those living in rural areas and the developing world, as they may not even have a doctor nearby.

We are, and always will be, the first line of defense for our own health. We can figure out when something is wrong, like when a parent checks their child’s temperature using the back of their hand to see if they have a fever.

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Eat Me: From classroom project to pitching at the Palace

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 9 October 2017

Student entrepreneurs Siena and India are taking on the food waste challenge with their innovative, fridge scanning app. What started as a classroom project has grown to a working prototype, winning its inventors the Big Bang Fair’s Junior Engineer of the Year award and a shot at pitching their idea at St James’ Palace. We met up with them to find out more!

Tell us a bit more about the Eat Me app. How does it work?

Siena: Eat Me is an IOT solution that helps transform the relationship between the consumer and the amount of food they waste in their homes. We have built a working prototype that turns any fridge into a smart fridge. It scans best before dates, optimises menus, orders food or even alerts another user if you are running out of certain products in your fridge.

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Intelligent homes: your tech is getting smarter

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 26 January 2017

Panellists discuss AI at CES 2017

As the doors opened to this year’s CES tech show in Las Vegas, the latest in tech and gadgetry was unleashed on the world. With everything from smart hairbrushes to IoT-connected recycling devices on display, the hottest products hitting the stage all proclaimed their ‘intelligence’. But what does owning a ‘smart’ device actually mean?

The idea of artificial intelligence, or at least the notion of machine-based reasoning, has been knocking around since the late 1600s. Child prodigy and mathematician George Boole set about using his favourite subject to explain logic. He developed his idea into a new type of algebra which used only ‘true’ or ‘false’ statements. This algebra, or ‘Boolean logic’, became an essential tool in modern computing.

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The USB tech that’s going viral

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 21 November 2016

hiv-usb-image-2-web

A team of engineers and scientists from Imperial College London and DNA Electronics has developed a disposable USB device to detect HIV with a single drop of blood.

The tiny test kit uses a mobile phone chip to determine whether the HIV virus is present in a small blood sample. When the virus is picked up, it triggers a change in acidity that the chip converts into an electrical signal. The USB stick stores the signal and gives an accurate test result when plugged into a computer program.

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New video: The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 13 September 2016

In this new video, find out more about the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering and how it is inspiring young people to consider a career in engineering. Hear from industry leaders, QEPrize judges and Ambassadors as they explain the impact of the QEPrize and the legacy of its winners.

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Robotic Bar sets sail on the Harmony of the Seas

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 21 June 2016

Royal Caribbean cruise ships made headlines earlier this year as the world’s largest cruise ship, Harmony of the Seas, pulled into port in Southampton.  After 32 months in construction the ship was finally complete, measuring almost four football fields in length, and built from over half a million individual components.

In addition to the list of superlatives that accompany the record-breaking ship, Royal Caribbean’s floating city also plays home to the tallest slide at sea, spacious state rooms complete with virtual balconies showing real-time views of the ship’s destination, and a bar served entirely by robots.

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QEPrize winner, Vint Cerf, elected as Foreign Member of the Royal Society

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 5 May 2016

QEPrize winner, Vint Cerf at a schools' event encouraging young people to think about engineering

Winner of the inaugural Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering, Dr Vinton (Vint) Cerf, was last week elected as a Foreign Member of the Royal Society.  An American computer scientist, Cerf is considered one of the ‘fathers of the internet’ and, along with Robert Kahn, Louis Pouzin, Marc Andreessen and Sir Tim Berners-Lee, was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering in 2013 for his contribution to revolutionising the way we communicate.

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