Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Collaboration

Arcadia’s fire-breathing spider inspires young engineers

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 11 May 2018

Imagine that you’re in the middle of a festival crowd, dancing away to the most dynamic names in music. 50-foot fireballs are exploding into the air, audience members are being abducted by acrobatic performers and luminescent creatures are swooping from the sky. Oh, and imagine that you’re looking up at a 50-tonne mechanical spider.

Arcadia is a performance art collective renowned for engineering mechanical monsters that they use as large-scale performance spaces. Perhaps the most recognisable of these is The Spider, a 360-degree structure built from recycled materials. Created by sculptors, engineers, painters and pyrotechnicians, the arachnid is an experiential dance stage for festival attendees.

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Busting myths and building bridges: Ambassadors at Ashmount School

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 9 April 2018

How do you inspire the next generation of engineers? It turns out that a batch of ‘flying’ eggs, some eye-catching PowerPoints and a whole lot of spaghetti can make a pretty good start.

On 21-23 March, a team of three Ambassadors visited Ashmount School in Islington, to inspire students as part of their STEM week. Their lessons were inspired by engineering ‘heroes’ in the form of Andrea Beatty’s characters, ‘Iggy Peck, Architect’ (year 1) and ‘Rosie Revere, Engineer’ (year 2). Year 3 learned about Lonnie G Johnson (NASA engineer who invented the super soaker).

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Speeding up DNA manufacturing with biological engineering

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 24 January 2018

Modern engineering has moved on from the stage where hardware was always used for manufacturing, and computer software was necessary for programming. Today, we are close to being able to use purely biological approaches to produce drugs, food, clothing and even industrial goods. This discipline is called biological engineering, and progress has accelerated in the last ten years thanks to massive drops in the price of both DNA production and characterisation. However, the complexity of biology and the long time it takes to prototype proteins is still a major roadblock to progress.

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You won’t believe what we did last summer…

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 15 January 2018

Why on earth would anyone use 2 weeks of annual leave to build a model railway?  As STEM Ambassadors, we often joke that championing Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths is a full-time job. Problem is, we already have day jobs, as engineers.  That’s why we spent our summer holiday being filmed by Love Productions for a Channel 4 show, surviving clouds of midges and rain.

You are probably questioning our sanity now, but when you’re as acutely aware of the need for more engineers in your industry then it’s hard not to seize every opportunity to promote the industry in a more positive light.  Oh, and it sounded like a great challenge to take on an engineering project of such a grand scale, in a really tight time limit.   Still not convinced you that it was a good idea? Well, we’ve interviewed each other to see if we can explain a bit more behind our reasons.

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Engineering your destiny: One life, a thousand dreams, a million possibilities!

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 18 December 2017

An engineer, scientist and social tech entrepreneur, I am currently studying for a PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of Cambridge. The co-founder of two social tech start-ups, ‘Wudi‘ & ‘Favalley‘, my vision is to innovate, transform and empower society, revolutionising education through technology. I aspire to provide a platform for young people to become positive change makers for society.

Being in love with physics, exploring, and creating ‘stuff’, engineering came as an obvious choice to me. Trying to understand the mysterious ‘electric shock’ I received from objects as a child motivated me to take up electrical engineering as my specialisation. I started off with an undergraduate degree, then moved on to do a master’s and am now pursuing a PhD in the same area.

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Celebrate with the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering this December!

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 1 December 2017

Next week marks the most important day in our calendar, as we head to Buckingham Palace for the presentation of the 2017 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering!

Winning engineers Eric Fossum, Nobukazu Teranishi and Michael Tompsett will each be presented with their unique, 3D printed trophy by HRH the Prince of Wales. Together with George Smith, who is unable to attend the ceremony, this year’s winners are honoured for their contribution to creating digital imaging sensors. Found in billions of digital cameras and smartphones across the world, this innovation has transformed medicine, science, communication and entertainment. 

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From photo to finished model: the software making 3D mapping a snap

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 17 November 2017

Trik software displayed on tablet

Over the years, drones have gained popularity in the engineering and construction industry. Small and simple to fly, drones can quickly snap photos from every angle, giving a bird’s eye view of inaccessible areas. But thousands of photos are meaningless without the right tools to manage them. Drone mapping technology, or ‘photogrammetry’, helps make this task easier by converting drone photos into a 3D model. However, having only the 3D model is still not practical in most engineering work, especially in infrastructure inspection and maintenance. Trik is a specialised system, creating a 3D database. This allows engineering companies to make the most of their drone data.

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Celebrating the creation of digital imaging sensors

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 1 November 2017

A picture is worth a thousand words. Transcending languages, they cross oceans, reach out from space and show us inside the human body. In December, the winners of the 2017 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering will receive their award at Buckingham Palace. They are to be honoured for creating digital imaging sensors. Together, they have revolutionised the way we see and capture the world around us.

Digital imaging allows people worldwide access to a vast array of pictures and videos.  They have enable high-speed, low-cost colour imaging at a resolution and sensitivity that can exceed that of the human eye.  From snaps of individual cells to stars billions of light years away, image sensors have transformed our lives.

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