Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Design

From photo to finished model: the software making 3D mapping a snap

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 17 November 2017

Trik software displayed on tablet

Over the years, drones have gained popularity in the engineering and construction industry. Small and simple to fly, drones can quickly snap photos from every angle, giving a bird’s eye view of inaccessible areas. But thousands of photos are meaningless without the right tools to manage them. Drone mapping technology, or ‘photogrammetry’, helps make this task easier by converting drone photos into a 3D model. However, having only the 3D model is still not practical in most engineering work, especially in infrastructure inspection and maintenance. Trik is a specialised system, creating a 3D database. This allows engineering companies to make the most of their drone data.

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Micro Phone Lens: A cell phone based microscope

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 9 November 2017

Smart phones are the most iconic piece of technology of the modern age. They combine processors much faster than those that put a man on the moon, with colour touchscreens and high resolution digital imaging sensors. They can wirelessly send data to anywhere in the world and are ubiquitous; approximately 1 in 3 people worldwide own a cell-phone. Smart phones are changing the world, but still the potential of their technology is relatively untapped.

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People, not technology will make cities smarter

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 3 November 2017

It’s a cold morning in San Francisco and I’m in an Uber wishing I’d had time to rent a bike. We’re meandering slowly through commuter traffic to get to a talk with what now feels like the toughest audience I have ever faced. I’m talking about the 321 five to 11-year old students of North Hillsborough School, a respected primary in the suburbs of this great city. As CEO of a UK clean-tech company, Pavegen, I suddenly feel exposed and nervous. Will the slides work on the school’s set-up? Do I have any jokes for this age group? Will the kids get it?

I needn’t have worried. The children and their teachers were amazing. We’ve had a good deal of experience in schools, but I’m always blown away by the intensity of the reaction that our technology inspires in young people.

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GRAID moves closer to the pipeline front line

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 18 October 2017

With a bold new twin-chassis design, our ground-breaking GRAID robot is on track to transform the way National Grid inspects previously unreachable sections of its network. Project Lead David Hardman shares the latest as this innovative pipe dream gets closer to reality.

Human fascination with the power of machines has remained undimmed for decades. So it’s no surprise that our latest robotic innovation – Project GRAID – has been capturing the imagination of everyone from the national press to the gas industry, our customers and stakeholders.

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Eat Me: From classroom project to pitching at the Palace

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 9 October 2017

Student entrepreneurs Siena and India are taking on the food waste challenge with their innovative, fridge scanning app. What started as a classroom project has grown to a working prototype, winning its inventors the Big Bang Fair’s Junior Engineer of the Year award and a shot at pitching their idea at St James’ Palace. We met up with them to find out more!

Tell us a bit more about the Eat Me app. How does it work?

Siena: Eat Me is an IOT solution that helps transform the relationship between the consumer and the amount of food they waste in their homes. We have built a working prototype that turns any fridge into a smart fridge. It scans best before dates, optimises menus, orders food or even alerts another user if you are running out of certain products in your fridge.

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Alexandra Stefanescu: Designing the fastest race cars in the world

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 October 2017

Although I help to design Formula One race cars now, I started out studying Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol. It was only later that I got into aerodynamics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) that led me into motorsports. I went on to study for a Master’s degree in Aerodynamics at the University of Sheffield and have just finished my PhD at the University of Manchester.

A few years ago, I decided that what I want most is to work with race cars, and so I aimed straight for the world of Formula One. Designing Formula One race cars using CFD and aerodynamics means tackling some intricate technical challenges. Engineers must be self-motivated and creative, as well as adequately qualified of course.

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BAE Systems are futureproofing history aboard HMS Victory

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 4 October 2017

Staying cool under pressure and tackling surprising problems are vital skills for an engineer. A specialist team at BAE Systems have found these strengths stretched to the limit with an unusual restoration project.

Working with the National Museum of the Royal Navy, BAE Systems are helping preserve the world’s oldest commissioned warship for future generations.

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What’s next in the world of engineering?

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 2 October 2017

Engineering is responsible for the pulleys, wheels and bows and arrows that carried us towards civilisation. It powered the SS Great Britain across the Atlantic and raised the Eiffel Tower. Without engineering, we wouldn’t have powerful computers tucked away in pockets or a direct line to outer space. Since its inception thousands of years ago, engineering has undoubtedly shaped our world. The question we’re addressing this month, however, is what happens next?

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