Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Inspirational Engineers

INWED 2018: A discussion with Serena Best

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 23 June 2018

Profile image of Serena Best for International Women in Engineering Day

Serena Best is a both a Professor of Materials Science and Fellow of St. John’s College at the University of Cambridge. She co-directs the Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, holds 9 different patents, and has produced almost 300 academic publications. Serena is a Fellow of both the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (and holds the position of Senior Vice President for the latter). She was awarded a CBE for services to Biomaterials Engineering in 2017.

We sat down with Serena to learn more about her work, what sparked her career, and her thoughts on starting a career in engineering.

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Meet the new QEPrize judges: Henry Yang

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 24 April 2018

Dr Henry Yang is an aerospace engineer based in California, currently serving as the Chancellor of the University of California, Santa Barbara. Having authored over 180 scientific articles over his career, his current interests include developing bio-inspired materials, sensors, and actuators for building aerospace, mechanical, and civil structures. We are pleased to announce that Dr Yang is one of six new judges joining the QEPrize panel for the 2019 prize.

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Meet the new QEPrize judges: Jinghai Li

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 11 April 2018

We are pleased to introduce a new judge to the QEPrize judging panel: Jinghai Li. Professor Li established the Energy-Minimization Multi-Scale (EMMS) model for gas-solid systems. Currently, he works to promote the concept of mesoscience based on the EMMS principle of compromise in competition as an interdisciplinary science. We spoke to Professor Li to find out more about him.

What do you consider to be the most important innovation of the last 100 years?

I think the most important innovation has been information technology, which has lead significant changes in social life and human behaviours, such as in communication and computation.

Why is it so important that we attract young people into the field of engineering? What motivates you to be an advocate for young engineers?

At the moment, research paradigm in science and engineering is changing very quickly, calling for new knowledge and new conceptual input. We need young engineers because they are more open to be involved in this change.

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Meet the new QEPrize judges: Raghunath Mashelkar

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 3 April 2018

Dr Raghunath Mashelkar is a chemical engineer from India. He is currently National Research Professor, Chairman of India’s National Innovation Foundation and President of Global Research Alliance. We are pleased to announce that Dr Mashelkar will be joining the QEPrize judging panel for the 2019 prize.

Why did you become involved with the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering?

Nobel prizes in chemistry, physics, economics, literature, peace and physiology or medicine acknowledged the path breaking human achievements in these fields. But for the first time, Queen Elizabeth Prize in Engineering recognises the great transformative and game changing role that engineers play. Most importantly, the prize recognises ground breaking innovations that bring global benefit to humanity. As a proud engineer, I feel extremely privileged to be a part of the eminent jury for the selection of this great prize.

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Meet the new QEPrize judges: Ilya Marotta

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 27 March 2018

Ilya Espino De Marotta is a marine engineer who has worked on the Panama Canal for over 30 years. She led the expansion of the Panama Canal as Chief Engineer, which was completed in 2016. Ilya has won numerous awards for her work in engineering and is seen as an outstanding role model for women in the industry. We are delighted that Ilya is joining the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering judging panel for the 2019 prize.

Why did you become involved with the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering?

I was invited to participate, and I am honoured to have been invited. I believe in engineering as a game changer for the world.

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BUILT – The hidden stories behind our structures

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 14 February 2018

Engineering is all around us – it’s an intrinsic part of our society. In her new book, QEPrize Ambassador Roma Agrawal explores how construction has evolved from the mud huts of our ancestors to towers of steel that reach into the sky. Below is an excerpt from the book, which is out now!

On the morning of 12 March 1993, I went to school in the Juhu district of Mumbai as usual, with my hair tied neatly back, wearing a crisp white blouse and grey pinafore. My teeth were hidden by braces, which were interwoven with my choice of green bands; definitely not cool (yes, even at nine I was already the class nerd). At 2.00pm Mum picked up my sister and me in our lime-green Fiat and took us home. While she was parking the car, we raced up four flights of stairs in our daily competition to see who could make it to our front door first. But something felt different. We stopped at the last step; we couldn’t get to the door because our neighbour was standing there, nervously fiddling with her dupatta, looking distressed.

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Dr Vint Cerf – 5 years on from winning the QEPrize

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 5 February 2018

Dr Vinton Cerf was one of the recipients of the inaugural QEPrize, taking the accolade in 2013 for his part in creating the Internet. He was awarded the prize alongside Dr Robert Kahn, Louis Pouzin, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Marc Andreessen, whose work gave rise to the fundamental architecture of the internet, the World Wide Web and the browser. We caught up with Cerf, who is now vice president and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google, to find out what his team has been working on since he received the prize.

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Digital technology and the changing world

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 1 February 2018

The QEPrize has often put a spotlight on technological innovations, with the creators of the Internet and the World Wide Web receiving the award in 2013, and the inventors of the digital imaging sensor taking the prize last year. These two pivotal developments in technology have truly changed the way people communicate all over the world. The impacts of the technologies have also transformed many industries, from entertainment, to education, science and medicine.

Last year’s Create the Future report revealed the vast scale of the impact of technological innovations on society. Respondents from 10 countries picked computers and the internet as the most important innovations in the last 100 years, with artificial intelligence and robotics following closely behind. However, although people recognised AI and robotics as important, they did not necessarily see them as relevant to their daily lives.

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