Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Young Engineers

Digital image sensors become the physicians of the future

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 November 2017

It goes without saying that there are not enough doctors in the world to see everyone, every day, for all our health needs. Doctors will only see us if we go to their offices, and will only run complicated tests if they have a reason to do so. The situation is even worse for those living in rural areas and the developing world, as they may not even have a doctor nearby.

We are, and always will be, the first line of defense for our own health. We can figure out when something is wrong, like when a parent checks their child’s temperature using the back of their hand to see if they have a fever.

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A trip to Mars, via Hawaii!

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 11 October 2017

Jetting off to Hawaii in the name of science certainly sounds appealing, but for one intrepid group, it wasn’t all beaches and barbecues. In January, six scientists and engineers traded their home comforts for a life on Mars. Or at least, the closest imitation of life on Mars without leaving the atmosphere.

The HI-SEAS project, or the ‘Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation’, is a geodesic dome perched on a Hawaiian volcano. Set on a lava field around 8000 feet above sea level, the remote habitat is surrounded by Mars-like geology. Stranding crews on the mountain, the NASA-funded project aims to find out what is needed to endure long-duration space missions, including the trip to Mars.

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Eat Me: From classroom project to pitching at the Palace

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 9 October 2017

Student entrepreneurs Siena and India are taking on the food waste challenge with their innovative, fridge scanning app. What started as a classroom project has grown to a working prototype, winning its inventors the Big Bang Fair’s Junior Engineer of the Year award and a shot at pitching their idea at St James’ Palace. We met up with them to find out more!

Tell us a bit more about the Eat Me app. How does it work?

Siena: Eat Me is an IOT solution that helps transform the relationship between the consumer and the amount of food they waste in their homes. We have built a working prototype that turns any fridge into a smart fridge. It scans best before dates, optimises menus, orders food or even alerts another user if you are running out of certain products in your fridge.

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Alexandra Stefanescu: Designing the fastest race cars in the world

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 6 October 2017

Although I help to design Formula One race cars now, I started out studying Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol. It was only later that I got into aerodynamics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) that led me into motorsports. I went on to study for a Master’s degree in Aerodynamics at the University of Sheffield and have just finished my PhD at the University of Manchester.

A few years ago, I decided that what I want most is to work with race cars, and so I aimed straight for the world of Formula One. Designing Formula One race cars using CFD and aerodynamics means tackling some intricate technical challenges. Engineers must be self-motivated and creative, as well as adequately qualified of course.

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Charlie Jerome: Life as an engineering apprentice

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 25 September 2017

Charlie is an engineering apprentice working at GSK Maidenhead. He joined the team in August 2014 and has worked in departments across the factory. We met up with him to find about a bit more about the challenges of life as an engineer and what he wants to see the profession doing in the future!

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QEPrize Ambassadors give a call to action for engineering engagement

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 20 September 2017

Yesterday saw the QEPrize holding its very first annual QEPrize Engineering Ambassadors’ workshop.

Taking place at Prince Phillip House, we met young engineers from different organisations, disciplines and regions. The aim of the workshop was to explore the public perceptions of engineering. Is industry doing enough to engage the engineers of tomorrow?

QEPrize ambassadors are an international network of young engineers. Coming from both business and academia, they are the future leaders in engineering. With a passion for engineering, they frequently engage in activities to promote STEM. Together, Ambassadors provide an influential voice to the engineering engagement community.

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How I got here: An interview with Orla Murphy

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 17 May 2017

Orla Murphy is a forward model quality engineer working in Jaguar Land Rover’s electrical quality team. This role looks at improving the quality of electrical components in current lines, as well as improving processes to design better quality electrical elements in future vehicles. Previously, Orla worked as an audio engineer, bringing together her love of science, maths and music to optimise the sound systems in Jaguar Land Rover’s vehicles.

Why did you first become interested in engineering?

I always enjoyed maths and science lessons at school – and was good at both subjects – so when I was 16, I entered the BT Young Scientist competition in Ireland. I really loved the experience of scientifically investigating a problem and coming up with a solution. It really sparked my interest in science and engineering as a future career option.

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Meet the trophy finalists!

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 30 January 2017

On Wednesday 1 February, we will be unveiling the winning design of the 2017 Create the Trophy competition. The top entry will then be 3D printed by BAE Systems and transformed into the iconic QEPrize trophy, to be presented to the winners of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering at Buckingham Palace later this year.

For the first time ever, this year’s contest was open to entries from all around the world, and we were blown away by the number and quality of the submissions. Entrants from 32 countries worldwide took part in the competition, giving the judges thousands of trophies to choose from. The expert panel of judges, led by Science Museum director Ian Blatchford, were then tasked with whittling the ten best designs down to just one winner.

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