Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Creativity

Hidden Figures – how the space race inspired a generation

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 24 April 2017

On 26th January this year I had the pleasure of watching 20th Century Fox’s new film Hidden Figures with a group of school girls from Manchester. This was an exclusive premiere screening organised by the Manchester United Foundation, preceded by a panel Q&A which allowed the girls to find out what it is really like to work in a STEM career.   My fellow panel members were Ginny Buckley (broadcaster and motoring journalist), Anita Bernie (Director of Spacecraft Platforms at Surrey Satellite Technology), Hazel Macnamara (Audit Partner at PWC) Elspeth Finch (Chair of the Royal Academy of Engineering’s Innovators’ Network) and Rachel Riley (mathematician and presenter of Countdown).

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Gamifying learning in the digital classroom

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 21 April 2017

Virtual reality and adaptive learning could soon become essential additions to the modern teachers’ toolkit. With games becoming more realistic than ever before, Greenwich University’s senior lecturer in disruptive technologies saw the perfect opportunity for innovation.

Dr Ioannis Paraskevopolous has been awarded a £30,000 industrial fellowship by the Royal Academy of Engineering and has teamed up with leading science and engineering company, Qinetiq, to bring his interactive learning experience to life. The Collective Innovative Training Environment, or xCITE as he calls it, is the digital classroom of the future.

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Sean Gallagher: Additive manufacturing in aerospace

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 12 April 2017

Sean Gallagher is a senior additive manufacture development engineer at BAE Systems and a QEPrize Ambassador. We spoke to him to find out a little more about what additive manufacturing really is, and how it can revolutionise design and engineering in the world of aerospace.

What is additive manufacturing and how does it help?

Additive manufacture, or 3D printing, is still a relatively new technology, which has grown massively in the last decade.  The growing availability of new metallic and plastic materials continues to develop the scope of the technology, and therefore the impact it can have.

Whilst still supporting modelling and rapid prototyping to help us speed up design development, we can now start to develop products which are more fit for purpose. These can be made quicker, are lighter and often cheaper than conventional methods would allow. All of this means we can be more adaptable to meet our customer’s needs, using a technology that allows us to be more responsive and affordable than ever before.

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Women of NASA LEGO set blasts off

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 10 April 2017

MIT staffer’s creation celebrating the history of women in the U.S. space program selected to become official LEGO set.

Abby Abazorius | MIT News Office
MIT News

For years, Maia Weinstock, the deputy editor of MIT News, has been creating miniature LEGO figurines to honor and promote such scientists and engineers as MIT Institute Professor Emerita Mildred Dresselhaus, Vice President for Research Maria T. Zuber, and Department of Chemical Engineering head Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Chair Professor in Engineering. The figures are Weinstock’s playful way of boosting the visibility of scientists, in particular the work of female scientists.

Now, a set of LEGOs Weinstock created celebrating the history of women at NASA is about to blast off. On Tuesday, LEGO announced that Weinstock’s project, which spotlights five women who made historic contributions to the U.S. space program, has been selected to become an official LEGO set.

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KENOTEQ: Breathing life into new buildings

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 22 March 2017

When it comes to building, an awful lot of material goes to waste, both at the birth and death of a project. In fact, the construction industry sends millions of tonnes of waste to landfill every year, at a huge cost to itself.

In addition to this, new laws mean that by 2020 70% of all construction and demolition waste in UK must be recycled, while none will be allowed to go to landfill. This, coupled with the cost of waste disposal, has set the construction industry on the hunt for materials that are both good for the environment and good for their bottom lines.

Dr Sam Chapman and his spin-out KENOTEQ think they have the solution to just such a problem.

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Introducing the 2017 QEPrize trophy

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 23 February 2017

Designed by Samuel Bentley

This year’s iconic QEPrize trophy was selected from thousands of entries to the Create the Trophy competition. Open for the first time in 2017 to an international audience, we received an unprecedented number of entries from 32 countries worldwide.

The winning entry was designed by 15-year-old Samuel Bentley, from Wales, who took his inspiration from the highest Welsh peak, Snowdon.

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Dynamic educational toys bring building blocks to life

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 16 February 2017

Brixo Kit

Who hasn’t played with building blocks when they were kids? There is no doubt that the castles, vehicles and miniature cities of our childhoods were the stuff of legend.

Yet games of this nature—those that enable you to design, construct and even problem-solve—are more than mere playthings. They stimulate motor skills and hand-eye coordination, they promote analytical thinking, and they encourage creativity through invention.

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2017 QEPrize goes to the creators of digital imaging sensors

  • Posted by QEPrize Admin
  • 2 February 2017

2017 QEPrize winners

Four engineers responsible for the creation of digital imaging sensors were yesterday honoured with the world’s most prestigious engineering prize. The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering is a £1million prize, celebrating world-changing engineering innovations.

Eric Fossum (USA), George Smith (USA), Nobukazu Teranishi (Japan) and Michael Tompsett (UK) were announced as the winners by Lord Browne of Madingley, in the presence of HRH The Princess Royal, at the Royal Academy of Engineering.

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